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Educational Services

Welcome to Educational Services! Department of Labs produced webinars are offered on the first Tuesday of every month covering disease specific and utilization management topics. Our webinars are PACE and ACCENT accredited. Contact Megan Hinch at MTS for more information: meganh@medtraining.org.

2018 Webinars

January

Tues 9

January 9th, 2018, 11am-12pm PT

Description of Program Content:

Autism and intellectual disability (ID) are common, highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that frequently bring children to the attention of geneticists, neurologists, and other subspecialists . Autism and ID are characterized by extreme genetic heterogeneity and there is a growing variety of genetic testing options available to patients. After a brief review of these conditions, we will compare various testing options and discuss the implications of genetic testing for medical management.

Measurable Learning Objectives
At the end of this activity the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to discuss the current and future approaches to clinical genetic and genomic testing for children and families affected by autism and related disorders.
  • Participants will be able to identify diagnostic utility and challenges related to clinical genetic and genomic testing for autism and related disorders

Presenters:

Benjamin D. Solomon, MD, Managing Director, GeneDx

Tracy Brandt, PhD, FACMG, Assistant Director of Neurogenetics

 

MON
29

January 9th, 2018, 11am-12pm PT

Description of Program Content:

LabTalk: Happy Lab Happy Life, a Seattle Children's Hospital Series.
What is LabTalk?
In this series, experts from around the country discuss the hottest and most difficult topics in pathology and laboratory medicine with an emphasis on lab management and trends in testing, such as the explosion in genetic testing. You will laugh, you will cry, you will learn, and then you will cry again.  If it is a topic that makes you think about retiring early, we will talk about it and get you excited to get back to work.

Measurable Learning Objectives
At the end of this activity the participant will be able to:

  • List two technology trends regarding autoantibody testing.
  • Describe two challenges in the ordering of autoantibody testing by primary care providers in the context of systemic rheumatic (and related) diseases.
  • Discuss current challenges in test utilization regarding celiac disease.

Moderator:
Mike Astion, MD, PhD
Medical Director, Department of Laboratories Seattle Children’s Hospital, Clinical Professor University of Washington Laboratory Medicine

Presenters:

Mark Wener, MD
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington

Melissa R. Snyder, PhD
Consultant Division of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology
Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

 

 

TUES
6

Description of Program Content:
Implementation of Diagnostic Management Teams (DMTs), multidisciplinary teams of clinical experts whose role is to deploy evidence-based diagnostic testing algorithms and patient-specific interpretive reports, may reduce laboratory and, ultimately, diagnostic error.  This talk will discuss the epidemic of laboratory error and how DMTs reduce this error.  Using the example of a DMT focused on hypertension, the session will summarize methods for successfully implementing a diagnostic management team.

Measurable Learning Objectives
At the end of this activity the participant will be able to:

  • Define a Diagnostic Management Team (DMT)
  • Discuss how to choose an focus area for a DMT
  • Describe an example of a DMT in endocrine mediated hypertension

Assess the clinical utility of the hypertension (PA) DMT

Presenter:
Alison Woodworth, PhD, DABCC, FACB

University of Kentucky

Dr. Alison Woodworth is currently Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Kentucky Medical Center.  Where she is also Medical Director of the Core Clinical Laboratory and Point of Care testing. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry and currently serves as a director on the ABCC exam committee and Vice President of the credentialing committee. She is actively involved in teaching – having taught pathology residents, medical students, medical technologists, and endocrinology and maternal fetal medicine fellows.  She has also directed a COMACC certified clinical chemistry fellowship training program and will start a new program at the University of Kentucky.  Dr. Woodworth has been actively involved in numerous organizations including AACC where her service on numerous local and national committees including on the AACC Academy Board of Directors, Vice Chair of the House of Delegates, Vice Chair of the Pediatric/Maternal Fetal Medicine Division, and the Science and Practice Core Committee earned her the SYCL Service award.  She also serves on executive council of ACLPS.  Dr. Woodworth is actively involved in clinical/translational research and her noteworthy contributions in the areas of sepsis, endocrinology, and Maternal/Fetal Medicine have resulted in multiple publications and awards.

 

TUES
13

Description of Program Content:
Introduction to the effect of extracorporeal Life support (ECLS), also know as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the hemostatic system. Hemostatic changes in the patient, development of thrombi in the extracorporeal circuit and anticoagulation used to prevent thrombi.

Measurable Learning Objectives
At the end of this activity the participant will be able to:

  • List the different types of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support
  • Describe the bleeding and thrombotic problems associated with cardiopulmonary support.
  • Name two tests used to monitor hemostasis and anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary support

Presenter:
Wayne Chandler, MD
Division Chief Laboratory Medicine, Department of Laboratories, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Wayne L. Chandler, MD is currently Division Chief for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Laboratories at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Clinical Professor of Laboratory Medicine at the University of Washington. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Utah, his medical degree from St. Louis University School of Medicine, and completed a residency in Clinical Pathology at the University of Washington. He worked in the Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of Washington for 20 years and for 4 years in the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital. His clinical practice and research focuses on diagnostic testing for hemostatic and thrombotic disorders.